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M&G Totoma (0.5mm)

1 Apr

I am not afraid to admit it: I buy pens and pencils on the spot because they make me laugh.  I really don’t need more of a reason than that to justify a pen purchase.  The totoma, though, didn’t just make me giggle; it brought joy to my heart and warmed my soul.  Calling the pen silly would be a gross understatement.  I dare you to show me a sillier pen (and please do show me if you can think of one).

Totoma the plastic tomato, ruling kindly over his paper domain.

For starters, it has a tomato for a cap.  Doesn’t it look smug?  Maybe its because it wears its stem-crown very casually like a tipped hat.  I’ve named him totoma the tomato, and let me tell you, he’s the best damn plastic-tomato-cap there is.  Then there is this guy:


What the f@#%....

WHAT THE F&*#!

I’m not even sure where to begin with this thing.  It seems to be a human…wearing an eggplant costume…with a long tail…looking awfully embarrassed and blushing.  I wonder which is more embarrassing: being in an eggplant costume or being in an eggplant costume with a tail?  I almost feel bad for the thing.  I’m sure he’s (or she’s or it’s) a good eggplant-man once you get to know him.  It gets better:

Simply amazing.

At the bottom of the pen are two little bottles…with animal faces…and leaves sprouting from their caps (!?).  Um, yes.  Don’t ask why, just accept it.  Maybe they are the hybrid offspring of totoma and eggplant-man, maybe they aren’t.

Couldn't have said it better myself.

The slogan ties it all together.  “Nutrition is abundant”.  All this time I thought nutrition wasn’t abundant–thankfully totoma cleared up this misconception.  I’m not exactly sure how an embarrassed man in an eggplant costume relates to the abundance of nutrition.  I hope the implication is not that we eat him.  Maybe thats why he looks so scared…  I think the more important question to ask is “what does this have to do with pens or writing?”  I do not have the slightest idea.  I prefer not to question such things when I get so much brilliance for just one dollar!  What I do know, however, is that this pen writes surprisingly well.

Pop off totoma and a sharp looking 0.5mm needle unsheathes itself.  Jotting a few lines down proves to be a very smooth experience for such a tip.  The ink is dark and dries quickly without bleeding or skipping, and the line is consistant.

One of these is the totoma, the other is a 0.5mm Hi-Tec-C.

I did a little comparison to see how similar the totoma is to a Pilot Hi-Tec-C.  Looking at the picture above, can you tell which pen drew which line?  Both are dark, smooth, consistant lines.  The top is the Pilot and yes, if you look very very hard you will notice that the ink is a smidgen darker than the M&G’s.

Hi-tec the serious versus totoma the silly.

Both tips are a very similar design.  The ball is mounted to three crimps pressed into the needle to reduce friction.  Here is a little diagram (taken from JetPens here) showing what this looks like up close:

The ball only has to make contact with three small points rather than the entire rim of the needle.

Alas, the totoma’s tip is not on par with its primary competitor from across the eastern sea.  It looks a little underdeveloped with no protective sleeve to keep it from bending.  I am not a tip bender so it doesn’t worry me but I know many of you have tip-bending issues.  The totoma is no Hi-Tec-C, but then again, the Hi-Tec-C is no totoma.  Sure the Pilot will slightly out-perform (ok maybe slightly more than slightly) the totoma, but does it have a man in a eggplant suit, or a tomato cap, or jolly looking bottle/plant/creatures?  I didn’t think so.  Plus, it only costs a dollar–chump change for such a masterpiece.  If you don’t yet own a single Hi-Tec or G-Tec then you should probably get that purchase out of the way before treading into totoma territory.  Perhaps, though, you Hi-Tec virgins out there would not be jaded by extreme Japanese precision and find even more joy in the totoma.  Either way, this is the sort of pen that some people look at and they know they must have it.  Others cannot handle the awesomeness that is TOTOMA!

Can you handle such greatness? That is for you to decide.

If anyone knows where to get this pen online, please let me know.  I found it randomly at a little stall in Koreatown.  One day I will go back and get the other version they had with a bottle for a cap instead of a tomato.

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Face-Off: Pentel Sharp P205 vs. Dartz Smart Jedo

26 Mar

I love the Pentel Sharp P205.  It is built very well, reliable, comfortable, precise and everything else great about a Japanese drafting pencil.  I find the plastic to be much more comfortable to hold than a heavy knurled grip for any long period of writing and it also helps to keep the weight down.  The lead-extension mechanism is built to last.  It has a very linear feel, projects EXACTLY the same (~0.08mm) line, and never allows the lead to slip through its clutch.  Perhaps I am not the best judge because I am a bit obsessed with utilitarian designs, but I think the Sharp also looks fantastic.  It means business.  I can do anything pencil related with the P205, such as drafting, technical sketching, and writing.  It never skips a beat or lets me down.  Any time I am reaching for a pencil (which is admittedly not very often), there is a very high chance I grab the p205 over the rest.  Many of my pencil-loving friends agree that the Sharp is one of the best, if not the best, all-around mechanical pencils.  No, the tip does not retract into the barrel of the pencil and yes, the tip can get bent if you drop it.  This is a drafter’s pencil–it needs to be able to trace around objects with ease.  It would be nice to have a retracting mechanism such as the GraphGear 1000’s, but such luxuries would weigh the pencil down and add more bulk to the icepick-like design.  The P205 is so universally popular that many try and imitate the Sharp’s greatness…

Twins?

Enter the Korean-made Smart Jedo.  A sticker on the side claims that a company called “Dartz” makes this model but I have seen similar (and likely the exact same from the same factory) pencils made by Morning Glory and Dong-A, and a host of other Korean brands.  This Smart is the most interesting Sharp clone I have come across to date and at $1.25 I picked it up without hesitation.  Just look at that silly little oven-mit logo!  The dimensions and barrel are practically identical to the P205 as if it was cast in the same injection mold.  Unlike the smooth-plastic pentel, however, the Smart Jedo is coated in a matte, non-slip material.  The grooves are also cut deeper into grip, and the plunger-cap has been replaced with a lead-hardness dial.  I commend this “Dartz” brand (whoever they are) for attempting to update the design a little bit instead of merely copying the Pentel.

Lead-hardness dial 'upgrade'

Unfortunately, the Smart Jedo is no P205.  While the non-slip coating is a nice touch, the hardness window isn’t even lined up correctly and rattles around a bit when I write.  The lead-extension systems are night and day.  The Smart’s mechanism is imprecise and unreliable, sometimes shooting out too much lead (~0.5cm) and sometimes not extending any lead at all.  Here is what happens when you press the knocks down 5 times in both pencils:

This is usually what happens. Sometimes the Smart's lead is even longer, or much shorter than the P205's (which remains exactly the same length every time).

I certainly cannot call the Smart Jedo a bad pencil.  On the contrary I actually rather enjoy using it.  The non-slip material works very well and is comfortable in the hand.  The lead does not slip back into the barrel as far as I can tell.  But when comparing the original Sharp to the Smart, I have no choice but to notice the obvious flaws form the first click of the plunger.  It feels cheap, flimsy, and imprecise whereas the P205 feels sturdy, precise, and has a mechanism that would be welcomed in far more expensive pencils.  If you ever happen to be in Koreatown or some other Korean marketplace (or Korea…) and have some change to spare, I would say go for it.  I did, and I think it’s a fun little pencil.  If you want a workhorse, save your money and get a P205.

Note: I used the included leads for both pencils.  The Smart’s lead feels softer than HB and is more prone to breaking than Pentel’s lead.  Easy fix though.