Pentel Graphlet 0.3mm

27 Mar

This is a Guest Review by Ezekiel Golvin

An advantage of being past grade school is being the master of my domain, with respect to school supplies. With college came paper and pencils on my own terms, and after four years my opinions have become sufficiently developed to give to others. This is a review of the Pentel Graphlet in 0.3mm from the perspective of a mathematics student who takes copious notes and does the occasional doodle.

To begin with a disclaimer, my pencil use is mildly unusual. In my past two years of note-taking, I have not ever used the onboard eraser on any of my mechanical pencils (to which eraser I entrust the job to will come as a later post). I immediately throw away any lead that comes in a pencil and replace it with the suitably sized HB lead, almost always Pentel Hi-Polymer Super HB (although Uni HB NanoDia lead has recently been given a shot at the big time). I hold my pencils rather unusually, which will be explained further down. These aspects color my review, and as such one’s mileage may differ from mine.

The Pentel Graphlet is one of the better Pentel offerings. Personally, I have never been taken by the hype of the Pentel P205; while the mechanisms of the pen are quite good, I find the styling dull and the all-plastic body a bit low-rent. It is certainly not a bad pencil; I just consider any mechanical pencil better than the P205 to be a “good pencil.” The Graphlet is a good pencil that brings along many of the features that (apparently) make the P205 so popular, such as incredibly consistent lead advancement (in very small, approximately 0.08mm distances) and no slip in the clutch.

One aspect the Graphlet maintains from its younger brother is a non-retractable tip. This is a risk that I personally do not care for at ten dollars per pencil; however, I understand that the inclusion of a retraction mechanism would add bulk and size to this quite svelte (0.8mm diameter) and handsome pencil. The tip design is quite lovely, too; I love the discrete step from the fine tip that expands to a metal cylinder to the body of the pencil. The pencil, as stated, is quite easy on the eyes. While admittedly the brown finisher on the end of the pencil is not the ideal color, the smokey gray barrel complements the silver accents very well.

The grip is where I and many others have a departure of opinion. I hold my pencils very close to the tip; upon inspection, my normal writing style places half of my pointer finger and thumb below the bottom of the knurled metal grip. I find that in humid environments (or when my hands are otherwise not entirely dry) this may cause some small but uncomfortable slipping of the pencil. Naturally, this directly follows from my odd hand placement. An acquaintance who holds the pencil slightly higher than I remarked that the knurled portion of the grip makes for quite a good hold. However, the knurled portion only makes up about two-fifths of the total grip length; readers of this post with high writing grip will almost certainly find the un-knurled section of the grip problematic to consistent writing. The Graphgear 1000 (also saved for a later review), pictured above the Graphlet, provides a much larger usable grip area. Another small note to make here is the fair ease of adjustment to the lead hardness indicator; unlike on the Graphgear 1000, the pencil does not threaten to unscrew on occasion when the lead hardness needs adjustment, nor does it twist after a long period of writing.

The brown plastic cap at the top of the Graphlet indicates that the pencil is of the 0.3mm lead size; the large, white “.3” printed on the cap is both easy to see and feel (it’s carved into the plastic). On the Graphgear 1000, the metal cap only had a sticker indicating its lead size, which I promptly removed because it ruined the looks of the pencil. I enjoy small touches like this, and I think Pentel chose a wonderful font both here and on the barrel’s labeling. The clip portion is also sufficiently far from the grip that I never have it pressing into my hand, no matter how I rotate the pencil, which is another aspect of a pencil that I think is very important.

Onto the writing. This 0.3mm-style pencil is a new purchase for me; I have long adhered to 0.5mm for general notetaking and drawing, as its versatility is fantastic and the lead is the proper mixture of fine lines and sturdy structure. On the left of the above picture is a homework assignment done in 0.5mm, and on the right are notes in 0.3mm. The 0.5mm is darker, which is largely due to the fact that I am less confident in my ability with the thinner lead. In 0.5mm lead, I broke the tip once every week or so; in 0.3mm, that frequency is increased to once per two days, which is still not extremely high but it does make me more wary of pressing more firmly into the paper. However, I absolutely am a big fan of how fine the 0.3mm line is; my notes have rarely looked cleaner, and this is after a comparatively short time using a lead this size. One final note: on regular paper, this Uni HB lead feels slightly scratchy; my guess is that this is due to the size of this lead, the tip forms a chisel point more quickly and as such the pencil must be rotated with a higher frequency. I imagine that as I continue to use this pencil the more frequent rotations will occur on their own and this problem will eventually disappear.

In summary, Pentel has a very good pencil in the Graphlet. However, the Graphlet’s charm is insufficient to dethrone my personal favorite pencil, the Pentel Graphgear 1000 in 0.5mm; the Graphgear has many more features that I like in a mechanical pencil and was only two dollars more. Do not let this dissuade one from a Graphlet purchase, though. If the Graphgear 1000 were an A-grade, the Graphlet is almost certainly a B+. Additionally, I have heard that Pentel is planning on discontinuing the Graphlet line, and since I consider this pencil to be superior to the P205, I highly recommend the Graphlet in its stead before it goes the way of Tyrannosaurus rex.

The Graphlet can be purchased online through JetPens

Pentel Graphlet Series

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